Liberia Shipment

Diverse Impacts of Liberia Shipment

June 16, 2020

Before the pandemic, WCE shipped 484 computers to Liberia.

The computers were prepared by volunteers at WCE’s Boston Chapter. The shipment was completed with assistance from Dr. Janice Cooper, a WCE International Advisory Council Member, and Leroy Beldeh, the WCE Field Associate in Liberia. Leroy is one of six Field Associates who are developing WCE Chapters in Africa. 

They faced many difficulties shipping the computers to their destinations, especially in clearing the port of entry in Liberia. However, with help from local organizations and authorities, the computers were eventually released.

The computers benefited a variety of people. In partnership with iEARN, an education nonprofit and WCE Partner, 339 computers were delivered to three schools and five community organizations in Monrovia.

“The computers are used for school computer labs and support youth between the ages of 15-25. iEARN-Liberia was able to set up a digital resource center for its Inspire Girls project and other ICT training for young people,” Leroy said. “We also have disabled youth–two visually impaired students and three audio impaired students–that are benefiting from the shipment.”

Hard at work, Leroy Beldeh, the WCE Field Associate in Liberia, unloads a computer shipment in Monrovia.

Although most of the computers are being used in educational contexts, others are being employed for the medical field. WCE sent 39 computers to the Phebe School of Nursing and five to a local hospital. Another three computers went to the Organization for Mental Health Promotion, which helps people with mental illnesses. Aaran Debah, the creator of the Liberia radio show “Hour of Mental Health,” was one of the recipients of these computers.

“We specifically use the computers for informational purposes and also to print our patients’ charts and do other necessary work for the organization,” Aaron said. 

Sitting against a wall, WCE computers Liberia wait to be distributed to organizations in Liberia that need them.

Cultivation for Users Hope, another organization dedicated to raising mental health awareness, received two computers as well. They are currently being used for daily administrative tasks.

“The use of the computers has made a big difference, we now use the computers to compile facilities’ reports, store patient information and complete monthly reports for the MOH at the county and national level,” said Benjamin Nallah, an officer with CFUH.

Despite the logistical challenges, this operation was successful because of the coalesced efforts between different organizations. Through these efforts, these computers will be able to continue benefiting people in Liberia.


Read more about WCE’s African Chapters project here.